How's the humidity in your home?

As fall approaches and winter is around the corner it is that time of year when we close the windows and try to seal our homes from winter’s harsh weather.  Before you go ahead and close everything up for the winter it might be time to consider moisture control.

Ask yourself a couple questions about winter in your home:

Do you live in a well-built super insulated home?

Last week we introduced you to the potential problem that lurks in your home.  If you have purchased or built a really good home, one that includes:

  • Insulation that is done well and greatly restricts heat loss
  • Thermal barriers that keep the cold out
  • High performing/quality windows
  • A home that is built tight

Guess what?  You possibly have a big problem lurking in the background that can cause you problems.  Here’s what happens:

A new Vermont home.

Yesterday we had another home set on its permanent foundation.  This home is located in Southern Vermont up in the mountains.  You may recall seeing a post of ours last week when the home was delivered.  We received several email inquiries and phone calls with questions about this house.

Yesterday we set both of the modules on the foundation and assembled the ceiling and roof of the great room.  The front half of the house is going to be a fully vaulted ceiling and a wall of glass looking out at the view.

Are there problems with a super-insulated home?

For weeks now we have been talking about how to stop Heat Loss and how to stop Cold Air Penetration.  To make a very complicated topic easy to understand; to stop Heat Loss is a matter of sealing up a home and insulating it very well.  Or, in other words, we are going to make your new home Very Tight.  Remember, homes do not breath, you and I breath but not homes.

Yes, we called for a delivery.

On Thursday, we had a home delivered to Southern Vermont in a beautiful Mountain location.  Look at today’s photograph and you will see one of the trucks and in the background, is another truck.

This home will be a Chalet Style home with expansive glass to take in the view and beauty of the location.

Each home has a process that is followed and yesterday’s delivery is but one of several aspects of ordering a modular home.

Are your appliances Energy Star Rated?

A long time ago, 1992 to be exact, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the EPA, created the Energy Star program.  Today appliances that are Energy Star Rated use upwards of 30% less energy.  This EPA program has been so successful that Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Taiwan, and the entire EU have all adopted the Energy Star program.

Let’s leave the basement and go up into the kitchen.

Here we are in the kitchen the room that many consider to be The Heart of a Home.  Lots of families all but live in the kitchen, it is where people gather, dinners are made, families congregate around the dinner table, and many a cup of coffee is had along with an occasional Adult Traveling Beverage.  The Kitchen Island is something that never happened in Grandma’s house, it is an idea born of the 21st Century where the kitchen is an integral part of The Great Room rather than a separate room.

How’s your laundry going?

And the topic for today is laundry.  No, we are not going to talk about soap, detergent, and softener for the clothes.

There are jokes about how some families can generate the same amount of laundry as a small country and that might be true.  Since Americans are so obsessed with cleanliness it is understandable that household laundry is the second largest consumer of Energy in your home.

Typically, laundry consumes a lot of energy in two ways:

Here are a couple more holes to close off.

We have been down in the basement so let’s stay there.

Remember, we are chasing holes in the building envelope where Cold Air can Penetrate and rob your home of precious heat.  Our goal is to:

  • stop Cold Air Penetration,
  • cut back on Heat Loss, and
  • be more Energy Efficient!

I can quickly think of three more possible culprits that need to be Foamed Shut:

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